Technology. Is it changing education?

Last week, during the #EDC3100 lecture I attended, the lecturer introduced our class to the SAMR Model.  That is, The Substitution Augmentation Modification Redefinition Model – Ooh!  Now it is clear – not.  Actually, it is quite explicit.

This particular “model”, developed by Dr Ruben Puentedura, is a process used to determine if the technology you want to acquire/introduce adds value to the learning experience.

There are four questions to consider:

  1. Is the purpose of the technology to substitute what already is in place/exists? [Substitution]
  2. Is this technology an effective resource to undertake common tasks, for example taking an e-quiz such as Google Form, in place of a written quiz? [Augmentation]
  3. Does this technology enhance learning, transforming the classroom? [Modification]
  4. Does the technology permit new undertakings, which would not be possible without it? [Redefinition]

Emileigh Rice, recently blogged (here) the question: Can Technology Change Education?  She claims it “is becoming heavily enriched in current Australian schools…”  I have to agree.  However, I think teachers need to be cautious in what is introduced, so as not to introduce something trending just for the sake of it.  Using the SAMR model will help alleviate this from happening.

It is understood at least one local school in the Fraser Coast district evaluates procurement of technology using the SAMR model.  The purchase of a particular software package or hardware must be justified using this process.  This is prudent, as it would alleviate the purchasing of trending or favoured items without due consideration to the value-add aspect to learning.  It is reassuring to know that schools wanting to incorporate cutting-edge technology are thoughtful about its implementation.

Click here for a more detailed look at SAMR Model.

SAMRimage.007

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